EEE-480/591: Feedback Control Systems

Arizona State University

EEE-480/591: Feedback Control Systems


Table of Contents

Course Objective
Prerequisites and Assessment Quiz
Selected Topics
Roadmap
Textbook
Laboratories
Matlab M-files
Class Notes/Exams/Homework
Videos
Related Materials
References
Under Development


Course Objective

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of fundamental principles, concepts, and techniques for feedback system analysis and design. Emphasis will be placed on relating engineering concepts to real-world problems and applications. Practical computer aided analysis and design will be a central component of the course. Application areas include: robotics, aerospace systems, and semiconductor manufacturing processes.

Guiding Principles: Philosophy, Approach, and Perspective

The following principles will be used to guide all developments:


Prerequisites and Assessment Quiz

PREREQUISITES

While each of the following topics will be visited, students are expected to be familiar with:

RULES FOR 480 ASSESSMENT QUIZ
Here is information regarding the upcoming EEE480 Assessment Quiz (next week).
NOTE:
Studying for your assessment quiz will significantly help you with the course material. Come see me if you need suitable references to study from.

In order to better understand the concepts, it is highly recommended to make use of the resources available in the lab website.
The INTERACTIVE EXAMPLES (Wolfram demo programs) can be accessed from Lab Website -> Resources -> Matlab M-files
(Note: You need to view the site with IE or Firefox, and need to download the Wolfram plugin to see the interactive programs. If you see a warning about security, make sure you allow all contents to be displayed)

MATERIAL FOR EEE480 ASSESSMENT QUIZ :

Solving a first order differential equation
Basic transform concepts
Transfer function
Poles
Zeros
Linearity
Zero input response
Zero state response
General solution
Stability
Step response
Time constant
Settling time

Frequency response
Magnitude and phase
Steady state response to a constant input
Steady state response to a sinusoidal input
3dB frequency
Unity gain crossover frequency

Complex Arithmetic
45-45-90 right triangle
30-60-90 right triangle
37-53-90 (3-4-5) right triangle

Block diagram algebra (including feedback loop)

RLC Circuit Transfer Function


Selected Topics

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to


Roadmap, Topics, Terms, and Assignments

  1. Fundamental Feedback System Concepts (5 Weeks, 10 Lectures, 1 credit)
    The purpose of this module is to provide an overview of fundamental feedback control system analysis and design concepts. Students will be exposed to block diagram analysis, analysis using Laplace transforms, modeling of dynamical systems, linearization, transient analysis, sinusoidal steady state analysis, stability, design specifications, internal model principle, root locus and Bode plot analysis, polar plots, stability margins, and computer aided design. All concepts are motivated via simple examples which are made progressively more complex to illustrate real-world problems and issues. Application areas will include robotics, aerospace systems, and semiconductor manufacturing. Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to analyze and design simple control systems using computer aided analysis and design tools.

  2. Analysis and Design Tools (5 Weeks, 10 Lectures, 1 credit)
    The purpose of this module is to develop an in-depth understanding of classical control methods and their application to real-world engineering problems. Methods to be covered include the Root Locus method, Bode plot methods, Nyquist methods. Application areas will include robotics, aerospace systems, and semiconductor manufacturing. Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to analyze and design control systems (of intermediate complexity) using computer aided analysis and design tools.

  3. Control System Design (5 Weeks, 10 Lectures, 1 credit)
    The purpose of this module is to develop expertise in designing relatively complex control systems. Design methods will include lead-lag design and loop shaping methods. Application areas will include robotics, aerospace systems, and semiconductor manufacturing. Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to design relatively complex control systems using computer aided analysis and design tools.

  4. Laboratory ( 1 credit)
    The purpose of the laboratory is to master computer aided control system analysis and design tools. Emphasis will be placed on real-world problems and applications. Upon successful completion of this module, students will be able to analyze and design relatively complex control systems using state-of-the-art computer aided analysis and design tools.


Future Updates

This roadmap will be updated as the semester progresses. All updates will be publicized via email.


Textbook

A.A. Rodriguez, ``Analysis and Design of Feedback Systems,'' Control3D, 2003.

Laboratories

The EEE480 laboratory is VERY DIFFERENT! It is a fun laboratory! The purpose of the lab is to teach students how to design and implement practical control systems.

Goals of the lab are to:
  1. shed light on material covered in lectures and homeworks; i.e. connect theory with reality;
  2. prepare students for exams;
  3. master state-of-the-art control system design tools (e.g. MATLAB, SIMULINK, Control System Toolbox, etc.);
  4. prepare students for a neat senior design project;
  5. HAVE FUN!
TA: Karan Puttannaiah - kputtann@asu.edu

Location: GWC 379


Lab Software
In this lab,we use ModelExplorer to analyse systems and controllers for all the lab exercises. The latest version of ModelExplorer can be downloaded from BlackBoard (you will need an ASU ID to access the website). The screenshot below shows the ModelExplorer main screen. Some features of ModelExplorer are:

Screenshot of ModelExplorer
(Click for a larger image)

Several demonstration videos below show some of the features of ModelExplorer and how they are used with the lab.

Cruise Control for a Car
In this lab, we look at designing a cruise control system for a car. The model for this lab is one of the pre-installed models for ModelExplorer, and can be loaded from the Model menu. This lab supports real-world effects like comparing linear and nonlinear models, and adding disturbances like wind. The lab manual can be found under the References menu in ModelExplorer, and The screenshot shows the integrated animation/plot view for this lab.

Cruise Control Lab - Screenshot
(Click for a larger image)

The video below gives an overview of ModelExplorer and the lab.


(Your browser might require plug-in to display video. Click to download video)

If the video appears clipped, try using a different player like VLC



Position Control for a Cart
This lab looks at controlling the position of a cart on track. To load the model, select the "Cart on Track" model from ModelExplorer (under the Models menu). The track is two meters long, and we examine how to position the cart to the desired set point without overshooting the track rails. The figure below shows a screenshot of the lab animation (including graphs).

Cart on Track Lab - Screenshot
(Click for a larger image)



Angle Control for an Inverted Pendulum
This lab looks at controlling the angle of an inverted pendulum. To load the model, select the "Inverted Pendulum" model from ModelExplorer (under the Models menu). The length of the pendulum (equivalently the instability) can be modified by choosing different plants from under the "Plants" menu. In this lab, we examine how changing the instability impacts the open loop and closed loop pendulum. Students play a game where they try to maintain the pendulum angle within a region for different pendulum lengths. Once they see the difficulty of open look control of unstable systems, an automatic controller is designed and implemented. The figure below shows a screenshot of the lab animation (including graphs).

Fixed base Inverted Pendulum Lab - Screenshot
(Click for a larger image)



Pitch Control of an Unstable Aircraft
The previous lab introduced students to the difficulty of controlling unstable systems. In this lab, we look at controlling the pitch angle of an unstable aircraft (F-35). To load the model, select the "Unstable Aircraft" model from ModelExplorer (under the Models menu). We examine the tracking accuracy of the automatic controller for different references, and look at how the frequency response can inform us about the limitations of the closed loop system. The figure below shows a screenshot of the lab animation (including graphs).

Unstable Aircraft Lab - Screenshot
(Click for a larger image)

The video below gives an overview of ModelExplorer and the lab.


(Your browser might require plug-in to display video. Click to download video)

If the video appears clipped, try using a different player like VLC


MATLAB M-Files

  1. Introduction to Exponential Functions
  2. Step Response For First Order System H(s) = a / (s+a) (a > 0) For Different Values of Parameter a, Speed of Response Decreases With Increasing a
  3. Frequency Response For First Order System H(s) = a / (s+a) (a > 0) For Different Values of Parameter a, System Bandwidth Increases With Increasing a
  4. Pole Dependence on Damping Factor for Standard Second Order Systems
  5. Step Response Dependence on Damping Factor for Standard Second Order Systems, Dependence of Overshoot on Damping Factor (Undamped/Underdamped Case)
  6. Step Response of a Second Order Underdamped System With Zero In Numerator, Effect of Zero On Step Response, As zero moves further into left half plane its derivative action becomes less pronounced, As zero moves closer to origin its derivative action becomes more pronounced.
  7. Root Locus For Nominal Second Order System - Nominal CLS Stable for all Non-negative k, Effect of A Third Pole - CLS Goes Unstable For Large k, Effect of Varying Third Pole With Gain k Fixed
  8. Feedforward Compensation Can Reduce Overshoot Caused By Zero (Derivative Action) In Series PI Compensator, Closed loop response to step reference command: (i) with series and no feedforward compensation, (ii) with series and feedforward compensation
  9. Introduction to Routh Table: Some Examples
  10. Introduction to Frequency Responses: Some Simple SISO Systems
  11. Reading Off Stability Margins from A Frequency Response: Unstable Second Order Nonminimum Phase System, Relating Bode and Root Locus Ideas
  12. SISO Analysis
  13. Impact of Plant Coupling on Decentralized PI Control Law m-file, Slides

Class Notes/Exams

Review Notes - Exam 1 - Sample 1(Spring 2016)
Review Notes - Exam 1 - Sample 2(Spring 2016)
Review Notes - Exam 1 (Fall 2015)
Chapter on Laplace Transforms from Text
EEE480 Student Class Notes (Spring 2012, 22 pages, 2MB)

Previous Exams

Class Homework: Sample solutions